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Enable Logpush to Splunk

Cloudflare Logpush supports pushing logs directly to Splunk via the Cloudflare dashboard or via API.

Manage via the Cloudflare dashboard

Enable Logpush to Splunk via the dashboard.

To enable the Cloudflare Logpush service:

  1. Log in to the Cloudflare dashboard.

  2. Select the Enterprise domain you want to use with Logpush.

  3. Go to Analytics > Logs.

  4. Click Connect a service. A modal window opens where you will need to complete several steps.

  5. Select the data set you want to push to a storage service.

  6. Select the data fields to include in your logs. You can add or remove fields later by modifying your settings in Logs > Logpush.

  7. Select Splunk.

  8. Enter or select the following destination information:

    • Splunk raw HTTP Event Collector URL
    • Channel ID
    • Auth Token
    • Source Type
    • Use insecure skip verify option
  9. Click Validate access.

  10. Click Save and Start Pushing to finish enabling Logpush.

Once connected, Cloudflare lists Splunk as a connected service under Logs > Logpush. Edit or remove connected services from here.

Manage via API

To set up a Splunk Logpush job:

  1. Create a job with the appropriate endpoint URL and authentication parameters
  2. Enable the job to begin pushing logs

Only roles with Cloudflare Log Share edit permissions can read and configure Logpush jobs because job configurations may contain sensitive information. Ensure Log Share permissions are enabled before attempting to read or configure a Logpush job.

1. Create a job

To create a job, make a POST request to the Logpush jobs endpoint with the following fields:

  • name (optional) - Use your domain name as the job name.

  • destination_conf - A log destination consisting of an endpoint URL, channel id, insecure-skip-verify flag, sourcetype, authorization header in the string format below.

    • <SPLUNK_ENDPOINT_URL>: The Splunk raw HTTP Event Collector URL with port. Example: splunk.cf-analytics.com:8088/services/collector/raw.
      • Cloudflare expects the HEC network port to be configured to :443 or :8088.
      • Cloudflare expects the Splunk endpoint to be /services/collector/raw while configuring and setting up the Logpush job.
      • Ensure you've enabled HEC in Splunk. Refer to Splunk Analytics Integrations for information on how to set up HEC in Splunk.
    • <SPLUNK_CHANNEL_ID>: A unique channel ID. This is a random GUID that you can generate by:
    • <INSECURE_SKIP_VERIFY>: Boolean value. Cloudflare recommends setting this value to false. Setting this value to true is equivalent to using the -k option with curl as shown in Splunk examples and is not recommended. Only set this value to true when HEC uses a self-signed certificate.
  • <SOURCE_TYPE>: The Splunk sourcetype. Example: cloudflare:json.
  • <SPLUNK_AUTH_TOKEN>: The Splunk authorization token that is URL-encoded. Example: Splunk%20e6d94e8c-5792-4ad1-be3c-29bcaee0197d.
"splunk://<SPLUNK_ENDPOINT_URL>?channel=<SPLUNK_CHANNEL_ID>&insecure-skip-verify=<INSECURE_SKIP_VERIFY>&sourcetype=<SOURCE_TYPE>&header_Authorization=<SPLUNK_AUTH_TOKEN>"
  • dataset - The category of logs you want to receive, which is either http_requests (default), spectrum_events, or firewall_events.

  • logpull_options (optional) - To configure fields, sample rate, and timestamp format, see Logpush API options. For timestamp, Cloudflare recommends using timestamps=rfc3339

Example request using cURL:

curl -s -X POST \
https://api.cloudflare.com/client/v4/zones/<ZONE_ID>/logpush/jobs \
-H "X-Auth-Email: <EMAIL>" \
-H "X-Auth-Key: <API_KEY>" \
-d '{"name":"<DOMAIN_NAME>",
"destination_conf":"splunk://<SPLUNK_ENDPOINT_URL>?channel=<SPLUNK_CHANNEL_ID>&insecure-skip-verify=<INSECURE_SKIP_VERIFY>&sourcetype=<SOURCE_TYPE>&header_Authorization=<SPLUNK_AUTH_TOKEN>", "logpull_options": "fields=ClientIP,ClientRequestHost,ClientRequestMethod,ClientRequestURI,EdgeEndTimestamp,EdgeResponseBytes,EdgeResponseStatus,EdgeStartTimestamp,RayID&timestamps=rfc3339", "dataset": "http_requests"}' | jq .

Response:

{
"errors": [],
"messages": [],
"result": {
"id": 100,
"dataset": "http_requests",
"enabled": false,
"name": "<DOMAIN_NAME>",
"logpull_options": "fields=ClientIP,ClientRequestHost,ClientRequestMethod,ClientRequestURI,EdgeEndTimestamp,EdgeResponseBytes,EdgeResponseStatus,EdgeStartTimestamp,RayID&timestamps=rfc3339",
"destination_conf": "splunk://<SPLUNK_ENDPOINT_URL>?channel=<SPLUNK_CHANNEL_ID>&insecure-skip-verify=<INSECURE_SKIP_VERIFY>&sourcetype=<SOURCE_TYPE>&header_Authorization=<SPLUNK_AUTH_TOKEN>",
"last_complete": null,
"last_error": null,
"error_message": null
},
"success": true
}

2. Enable (update) a job

To enable a job, make a PUT request to the Logpush jobs endpoint. Use the job ID returned from the previous step in the URL and send {"enabled":true} in the request body.

Example request using cURL:

curl -s -X PUT \
https://api.cloudflare.com/client/v4/zones/<ZONE_ID>/logpush/jobs/100 -d'{"enabled":true}' | jq .

Response:

{
"errors": [],
"messages": [],
"result": {
"id": 100,
"dataset": "http_requests",
"enabled": true,
"name": "<DOMAIN_NAME>",
"logpull_options": "fields=ClientIP,ClientRequestHost,ClientRequestMethod,ClientRequestURI,EdgeEndTimestamp,EdgeResponseBytes,EdgeResponseStatus,EdgeStartTimestamp,RayID&timestamps=rfc3339",
"destination_conf": "splunk://<SPLUNK_ENDPOINT_URL>?channel=<SPLUNK_CHANNEL_ID>&insecure-skip-verify=<INSECURE_SKIP_VERIFY>&sourcetype=<SOURCE_TYPE>&header_Authorization=<SPLUNK_AUTH_TOKEN>",
"last_complete": null,
"last_error": null,
"error_message": null
},
"success": true
}

Refer to the Logpush FAQ for troubleshooting information.

3. Create WAF rule for Splunk HEC endpoint (optional)

If you have the Cloudflare Web Application Firewall (WAF) turned on, you may see a CAPTCHA challenge when Cloudflare makes a request to Splunk HTTP Event Collector (HEC). To make sure this does not happen, you have to create a WAF rule that allows Cloudflare to bypass the HEC endpoint.

  1. Log in to the Cloudflare dashboard and select your account. Go to the Firewall.

  2. Click Create firewall rule and enter a descriptive name for it (for example, Splunk).

  3. Under When incoming requests match..., use the Field, Operator, and Value dropdowns to create a rule. After finishing each row, click And to create the next row of rules. Refer to the table below for the values you should input:

    FieldOperatorValue
    Request MethodequalsPOST
    HostnameequalsYour Splunk endpoint hostname. Example: splunk.cf-analytics.com
    URI Pathequals/services/collector/raw
    URI Query Stringcontainschannel
    AS Numequals132892
    User AgentequalsGo-http-client/2.0
  4. After inputting the values as shown in the table, you should have an Expression Preview with the values you added for your specific rule. The example below reflects the hostname splunk.cf-analytics.com.

    (http.request.method eq "POST" and http.host eq "splunk.cf-analytics.com" and http.request.uri.path eq "/services/collector/raw" and http.request.uri.query contains "channel" and ip.geoip.asnum eq 132892 and http.user_agent eq "Go-http-client/2.0")
  5. Under the Then... > Choose an action dropdown, select Bypass.

  6. In the Choose a feature dropdown, select WAF Managed Rules.

  7. Click Deploy.

The WAF should now ignore requests made to Splunk HEC by Cloudflare.